family,
28M 34S

Episode 70: The Family Business

September 04, 2018

Episode 70: The Family Business

We have so much to learn from the generation ahead of us. Rene Molina, gives some amazing insight on what it was like to grow up as a Pastor’s Son, and how that has helped him be a Pastor today!

EPISODE RESOURCES

GO DEEP INTO THE DIMES DROPPED, CONNECT WITH THE SPEAKER, AND CHECK OUT THE LINKS & RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:

  1. Instagram: @ReneJMolina
  2. RLAchurch.com

Episode Quotable

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Episode 70 Transcript

Mingo Palacios:

Welcome to the Purpose Driven Church Podcast where we sit down with leaders in and around the church to discuss current trends and challenges and how the five purposes of the local church matter today more than ever.

Mingo Palacios:

Welcome to the Purpose Driven Podcast. My name is Mingo and we are here at the Rancho Capistrano ranch and all week we’ve got some really amazing pastors and leaders and getting some time to connect with one another and getting some time on the ground training. And who do I meet? But young emerging Pastor Rene Molina in from Los Angeles. Born. Raised.

Rene Molina:

Yes, right. Raised.

Mingo Palacios:

There’s very few people born and raised. Sporting LA and here you already got the Dodgers cap. All fully fitted, ready to go. Suited and booted.

Rene Molina:

That’s right.

Mingo Palacios:

Rene. Give our listeners a little bit of context where you pastor, who is the pastor of the church you pastor, and how long that’s been going down?

Rene Molina:

Well, I’m 26 years old. My Dad is the senior pastor. He’s also my dad and he’s also my senior pastor.

Mingo Palacios:

In that order.

Rene Molina:

In that order. Yeah. Well it started 30 years ago, mainly a Hispanic church, first generation Hispanics. Then my wife and I, Keily, two years ago, we just started the English Ministry of our Church and yeah, it’s mainly millennials. We’re pastoring millennials and we’re, seeing a lot of life in it, a lot of some health. We’re excited to see that. And we’re starting to see different colors coming into our English ministry and a lot of people from inner city LA, suburb LA. So that’s a little bit of context about us.

Mingo Palacios:

I’ve got to believe that people are, they heard you say, “I started the English Ministry for my dad’s church.” Which is so opposite, I think of what traditional Southern California churches experience, right? They experience an English church that launches a Spanish ministry. So tell me, tell our listeners what it’s been like, or even what was the motive as you started to kind of get your leadership chops right? Was this something that you came to the table with? Is that something your dad said, “Hey, you know, we need to do this.” What was the motive that got it started?

Rene Molina:

Well, to be honest, it had started about four years ago, before we started. And so there was already four years of going.

Mingo Palacios:

Somebody else.

Rene Molina:

Somebody else, because the need was crying out to everybody. We’re a Hispanic church in LA and people are being born in LA and they’re not speaking Spanish and they’re not in the culture. And so we need it.

Mingo Palacios:

But the parents are bringing them to church.

Rene Molina:

Right. Right.

Mingo Palacios:

And their parents are full Spanish speakers. So they show up at your dad’s church, but now you have this like disconnect. You have a need.

Rene Molina:

Yeah, major need, like an elephant kind of a need.

Mingo Palacios:

And it’s not just a language need, it’s a culture.

Rene Molina:

Oh my Gosh.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s an entire culture addressed.

Rene Molina:

In so many ways a cultural need, a language need. And such massive need that we needed two different ponds. We needed two different places for people to flourish because it’s like saying the Spanish ministry was like the salt water pond and only certain kinds of fish could swim in there. And then the English ministry was like a fresh water pond and only certain fish could swim in there. And so if you try to send a freshwater fish into salt water, it’s not going to work.

Mingo Palacios:

Things aren’t going to work.

Rene Molina:

And then vice versa as well. And for sure we needed a need and the pastor that started English ministry actually asked my wife and I to take over. And so while we were in the Spanish ministry and getting our leadership rep I guess.

Mingo Palacios:

Your chops.

Rene Molina:

Yeah our chops. And so now it’s been two years and we’ve been building foundation for two years. Purpose Driven Church has been such a manual for me and starting a church. And yeah, we’ve been two years building foundation of a new culture, a new church. And it’s just so interesting.

Mingo Palacios:

There’s got to be some challenges in that, working for your dad’s church.

Rene Molina:

Major.

Mingo Palacios:

So let’s bring that to the surface because there’s got to be so many listeners who have, like, it’s a family business.

Rene Molina:

Right. Right.

Mingo Palacios:

Saddleback is a family business and you know, there’s got to be some things that you could, you could share with our listeners that would help them go, “Oh man, at least I’m not the only one out here who’s feeling this, talking about this.” You talked about the leadership, the central head figure mentality in a Hispanic church. And not that you’re trying to break that down.

Rene Molina:

Not at all.

Mingo Palacios:

But what are some of the things that you have that the Lord is kind of showing you, “Hey, this is what you need to do in this season in order to prep you for the next.

Rene Molina:

Yeah. Well, like you said, the Hispanic culture is very male centralized. I can only speak for the Hispanic first generation. I can’t speak for other cultures.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s what we are.

Rene Molina:

Right. Right. And that’s who I am. That’s where I came from and it was very centralized, very male oriented. Very. One guy.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. We use the word almost like “Pope-ish.”

Rene Molina:

Yeah. Yeah. If he doesn’t pray for me then I don’t want.

Mingo Palacios:

I don’t know if Jesus is here.

Rene Molina:

I’m staff and I’m on the prayer team. “I don’t want, I don’t care.”

Mingo Palacios:

“I want to wait two and a half hours.”

Rene Molina:

“The guy that’s always with the mic, that’s the guy wanted to pray for me.” And it’s like, “Oh, okay.” And I’ve even heard of people just closing their eyes and then as someone from the team comes, when they open their eyes, they literally shake their head like, “No, not you.” But then they say like-

Mingo Palacios:

“I guess Jesus, if you are as powerful as they say you are through this person that I’m kind of bummed is praying for me.”

Rene Molina:

And so that’s kind of the culture I was raised in. And it’s not, it’s not bad, it’s just, that’s the way my dad and his generation were raised like that. And I have to respect that. That’s really good. I can’t bash on that even though like my schooling and my reading and my mentors say completely otherwise, I have to respect that. And I can’t because if I want to live for the vision God has given me, I need to learn how to live for a vision of someone else.

Mingo Palacios:

Serve under somebody’s vision for a season.

Rene Molina:

Right. And so that’s honestly, that’s been the school that I believe I’m still in just respecting that that centralized leadership structure versus my generation is very decentralized and that has a lot that it gets deep into the country that were raised in and their country that they were raised in very dictatorship country. And then our country being very democratic. And so it’s just so deep on so many layers that differences and being able to reconcile them.

Mingo Palacios:

I definitely loved what you had said about the fact that, you said in one set you’ve got somebody whose perception of the church and their pastor is that “I want that one person to pray for me” and one of the values that is inside of the Purpose Driven values every member is a minister.

Rene Molina:

Right. And I believe that.

Mingo Palacios:

I believe it too. I don’t think that we would have ever got our shot at doing ministry had we not given a small little baton to see how we run with. What’s so interesting is that you’re not interested in deconstructing or disassembling that what your dad has built for the people that he’s built it for. Because you can’t deny the vision that God has given him.

Rene Molina:

Right. Right.

Mingo Palacios:

And the season that he’s-

Rene Molina:

And the fruit of it in the fruit of it.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. It’s all measured by the fruit. That’s so huge. That’s such a challenge, I think for our generation because we think differently. Not that it’s wrong, but every generation has its own perception of how things ought to be. And then instead of saying, “Well dad, I’m leaving because I want to do something different” to partner and in a way to still respect your identity, to respect each other’s deal. We’re saying leadership, it has to be a two way street. You have to move a little bit on your dad’s preferences and succumb and submit to those and in turn you submitting to his authority allows him to, when your time comes, to submit even to your potential.

Rene Molina:

It’s crazy.

Mingo Palacios:

Let alone being in a Hispanic culture,

Rene Molina:

It’s like dancing merengue.

Mingo Palacios:

[laughing]

Rene Molina:

It’s salsa. It’s like there’s so many steps and like we were talking and it’s not this one thing that, you know, read this book and it’ll solve that transition. It’s like a whole ingredients of; it’s a cake. It takes so many different things. It takes this book; it takes a mentor to be surrounded by. It takes emotional intelligence. It takes all these different things that need to be in play so that transition can go in an honorable way, in biblical way. And you hit it right on because there’s so many times where the next generation we’re like, “You can’t tell us what to do! You can’t tell us how we’re going to run church! You can’t tell us. I read this book and it said-”

Mingo Palacios:

Of course.

Rene Molina:

But then we kind of do the same thing.

Mingo Palacios:

You just perpetuate the same attitude. Same habits.

Rene Molina:

We do the same thing with the first generation. “That is such terrible leadership. Oh my gosh, look how terrible you do it. Wow, really?”

Mingo Palacios:

“Shut it down and start a new one.”

Rene Molina:

Yeah. But it’s, that has to be that mutual respect, that mutual trust.

Mingo Palacios:

They’re complimenting one another complementing one another.

Rene Molina:

I’ve heard so many churches, they say, “The next generation, the Joshua generation, they’re going to change the world.” And that’s cool and all but you need Moses and Joshua.

Mingo Palacios:

Wow. That’s good.

Rene Molina:

You know that you need both generations. I really can’t just one or the other and we live in such this false, we split these things where God never meant to split them. You know? And, and it’s like, well you need both Moses and Joshua.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s funny, I think of like all the references to running a race and the idea. We hold the baton conversation so often and I had been thinking about the fact that the person receiving the baton has to be running at full speed.

Rene Molina:

Right.

Mingo Palacios:

And you’re running at full speed with no baton. In a way, you’re running in preparation of what’s to come. So for our generation not to think, “Well hand it to me first and then I’ll start running, right? You have to be ready to run and you have to be willing to see the pace of the person who’s coming up, right?

Rene Molina:

Right. You need to go at their pace.

Mingo Palacios:

Exactly.

Rene Molina:

So that you can transition.

Mingo Palacios:

With no baton.

Rene Molina:

Right.

Mingo Palacios:

Just to say, “I’m ready to run. I’m ready to track with you, to run with you at your speed.” Don’t worry about the title. Keep an eye on the trajectory.

Rene Molina:

And part of this whole ingredient of this cake building of having this transition is that, is being able to understand the first generation. You have to understand them and how do you understand them? By listening to them. And something that my wife and I, we’re constantly doing is checking our hearts. Checking and being like, “They don’t have bad intentions. They don’t have bad instruction.”

Mingo Palacios:

Scripture tells us that’s what love is, right? Believes the best.

Rene Molina:

Right, believes all things. And so it’s like, I know them. I lived with this guy, I lived with it, I’ve seen him in his pj’s. Also seen him in a suit. I’ve seen him with the Bible and I’ve seen him-

Mingo Palacios:

With a belt.

Rene Molina:

Yeah. And I see him with a belt. Yeah. Yeah. Especially Hispanic culture. I’ve seen him with the belt and I know him and I know that even though he did this and it kind of hurt my millennial heart.

Mingo Palacios:

My snowflake self.

Rene Molina:

Yeah. My snowflake self. I know he had good intentions.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s really good.

Rene Molina:

And there’s actually this amazing marriage scholar, his name is John Gottman, and he says that part of healthy relationships is learning to give each other the benefit of the doubt. And so giving my dad and that first generation that benefit of the doubt has kept my heart clean. Even my wife, we’re constantly talking, reminding ourselves “They have good hearts. They have good hearts. We know it for sure. We know it for sure. We know for sure.” Because there’s certain cultural, like sparks.

Mingo Palacios:

And they just disconnect, right? What’s valuable to you may not be valuable to your father or the predecessor of the ministry and what’s valuable to them may not be the highest priority to you.

Rene Molina:

And I think the other point that you brought up in and it’s so true, you have to know the right time to start running because the baton’s coming. You can’t run too early or too late.

Mingo Palacios:

You missed the moment.

Rene Molina:

It’s so crucial to have that right timing. And I feel like that has a lot in tune with your relationship with God.

Mingo Palacios:

It has to. You’re not going to get actually, I don’t think that you’re going to get the cues. That’s what I loved about your dad’s devo. I’m bummed for everybody who’s just heard me say that because you didn’t hear it, but he was saying that leadership tactics and strategic relationships, those all will help, but the number one thing you ought to model yourself after is the walk of Jesus who’s best friend, the Holy Spirit, the whole way through. That is your timing. That is your yes, your no, your when, your when not’s, your who and who not.

Rene Molina:

When to start when to slow down.

Mingo Palacios:

When to start. When you slow down. All of those things are impressioned on and predicated by the spirit.

Rene Molina:

Yeah, and then we wonder as pastors like, “Why isn’t this happening? Why isn’t that happening?” And then what if the Holy Spirit’s going a lot slower than your running?

Mingo Palacios:

Totally.

Rene Molina:

It’s just being in tune with the Holy Spirit and I feel like the next generation. We need to be in tune with the spirit of God. We need to be like, “Okay, it’s not time yet.” Jesus constantly said knowing the wind, how the wind is blowing, knowing the weather. We can tell about the way the wind is going, the weather and I feel like as the next generation we also need to be good weather forecasters. We need to be able to be like, “It’s not my time yet. For sure it’s not our time.” Or it’s like, “You know what we need to start pressing in.” And so I just really think that we could easily blame the first generation, but most of the times they just have great hearts and it’s just cultural clash, you know, generational clash.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. Talk to me about how you have, I wrote a couple of notes down here. You had brought something up about the 2x effect.

Rene Molina:

Oh yeah man. That really was a game changer for me because her name is, I believe Lisa Wiseman. She wrote a book called Multipliers and she had this study from Harvard of the 2x effect. And the 2x effect is when the team, the leader does not delegate the team, empower the team-

Mingo Palacios:

Empower the team. Yep.

Rene Molina:

Yeah. When the leader doesn’t empower the team, it has a 2x effect, meaning that a team of 10 works like a team of five.

Mingo Palacios:

Interesting.

Rene Molina:

But when the leader does delegate and empower a team of 10, works like a team of 20. And so it’s interesting because we see the first generation sometimes busting themselves to just extend the Kingdom of God and they have such great hearts and they just work so hard-

Mingo Palacios:

But it’s on the shoulders of one.

Rene Molina:

But it’s on the shoulders of one.

Mingo Palacios:

Which actually means that they’re working at the pace of half.

Rene Molina:

Exactly. And we see that. The next generation. That’s something that I think that the next generation is going to bring and help the first generation that most of us, at least generally speaking, we’re all about empowering. Delegating.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. That’s good.

Rene Molina:

If we have a team of 10, we’re going to work like a team of 20. Where the first generation is very centralized leadership, the second generation, it looks more decentralized, more empowerment, more grassroots, more organic, vegan. Vegan California.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s interesting because yeah, it’s more like Vegan California burrito than it is like authentic Houston burrito. I would say this, that one of the fears for a generation that came before us is decentralized, sometimes you fear not seeing the people that there’s not control. And that’s just something that I’ve had to work so hard and diligently to bring trust to my supervisor and say, “Although you can’t see me, please try to see the effects. You can’t see me at my desk but see the effects of what I’ve been doing at a desk.” It might be at a coffee shop, it might be down here at the studio, might be at my mom’s house. It was just, you know, you have to know that the people you’re bringing to the team are trustworthy and you will never be able to trust them if you don’t deploy opportunities for trust to be earned.

Rene Molina:

As I’ve heard, “Empowered people empower others.” Powerful people empower others.

Mingo Palacios:

Powerful people empower others. Really good.

Rene Molina:

And it just shows so much like the most powerful person that ever walked planet earth, Jesus. What did he do? As it says in scripture, after He knew that all power and authority was given to Him, He got down and washed the feet of every single person. That’s just mind blowing. Like, what in the world?

Mingo Palacios:

Not what I would do as a human being, right?

Rene Molina:

Like, if you were just given a million dollar raise, would you just, “You know what? I’m going to give half of it to everyone.”

Mingo Palacios:

Of course.

Rene Molina:

And so I’m just seeing that it says a lot of how secure leader is by the way they empower and delegate. And when they don’t empower, it just shows a lot of like there’s some, maybe some stuff inside that they have to-

Mingo Palacios:

And it’s interesting because culturally, I would say, we talked a lot about emotional intelligence and how as a leader you’ll understand that you can go farther faster with a team, but initially the speed initially is always slower. It’s harder to bring a team together. It’s harder to train somebody.

Rene Molina:

It’s more complicated.

Mingo Palacios:

Absolutely.

Rene Molina:

Decision making is more complicated.

Mingo Palacios:

It may not be the quality that you would obsessively deliver if it was yours, but you will experience over time, the matrix is like a sloping line, right? You’ll go farther faster with a team. At first it’ll take time because you’ve got to bring everybody up to context. You have to give them the reasons and you have to walk with them through the stumbling blocks. But Jesus gave us the greatest model, right? You give us the greatest model. One man who could have done the work of 12. He took one person’s mission, his own, and he defused it amongst 12. The ultimate decentralized system.

Rene Molina:

That’s how secure Jesus is.

Mingo Palacios:

Come on. I want to be that secure. Right?

Rene Molina:

Yeah. Yeah. I think you touched a really good point because I’ve seen that in a centralized leadership. It’s simpler and it’s faster. Decision making is like one person just decided, “Okay, let’s move forward.”

Mingo Palacios:

“Do I want to, or do I not? Do we go there, do we? Don’t.”

Rene Molina:

Right. And then in an empowerment it’s messier. It’s more complicated, but it’s healthier. Like it’s kind of weird, a lot of people think health has to be organized and neat, but sometimes health gets messy.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah, of course. It always starts messy and I think it cleans out.

Rene Molina:

Yeah. Yeah, exactly. It cleans up like eventually and I just think that it’s easier, simpler, but I think the biblical way is empowering. The biblical way is it’s going to start messy, but then it’s going to get neater.

Rene Molina:

I heard someone once say, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, take others.”

Mingo Palacios:

Take others.

Rene Molina:

You know what I mean? And again it comes back to that. The centralized leadership of our first generation, it’s not that they had bad hearts, it’s just, that’s how they were trained. That’s how they learned.

Mingo Palacios:

And it was effective for the season. It was effective for that season.

Rene Molina:

There you go. Yeah, it’s true. It was effective for that season. But that transition there has to be that trust. My dad has to trust the next generation of leaders. If there’s no trust, it’s not going to work.

Mingo Palacios:

There’s no church.

Rene Molina:

Exactly. It’s not going to work. Simple as that. There’s this other book on team building that I read for school. I went to Vanguard. Represent. Vanguard University.

Mingo Palacios:

Hashtag Vanguard.

Rene Molina:

I learned that to build a team you need the three c’s. You need character, commitment and chemistry. Those three things are going to be like pillars on trusting that next leader or that team member. They need character, like the basic-

Mingo Palacios:

Building block.

Rene Molina:

Yeah, they need commitment. They need to know you’re committed to the church or the organization. And then third, chemistry, which I found interesting. In other words, they need to be able to get along with the rest of the team.

Mingo Palacios:

Right, there has to be something that vibes there.

Rene Molina:

And so having those three c’s and considering those three c’s, I’m trying to build a relationship with my dad, with my boss, with my senior pastor.

Mingo Palacios:

Personal relationship over policy.

Rene Molina:

Yes, yes. That’s all. And like I told you before, I met with one of the leadership gurus at my school at Fuller Seminary represent, and I asked him, “Hey, so you know, there’s this transition going on of leadership and like how do we transition the leadership for the next generation?” And he told me, “Rene, you’re asking me for step 12 when you still haven’t done step one or two.”

Mingo Palacios:

That’s big.

Rene Molina:

And I’m like-

Mingo Palacios:

Kind of like a wake up call.

Rene Molina:

Yeah, exactly. Like kind of a reality check like where you’re at. And I’m like, “Tell me what’s step one and two?” And he said, “Step one and two is to make sure your relationship with your dad is healthy or with your pastor, with your boss or your senior pastor, make sure that is just top notch healthy.” And so ever since then my dad and now we’ve been meeting once a month, just synchronizing, just getting on the same page, listening to each other, understanding each other.

Mingo Palacios:

And this is professional. People are like, “You only see your dad once a month?” But this is like on the books, we’re talking church talk. Not like, “Who’s buying the piñata for the cousin’s birthday party?”

Rene Molina:

Yeah, exactly. Because I feel like we need to be able to differentiate ministry time and then normal family time. And a lot of pastors, they forget to be normal. They forget to have normal conversations.

Mingo Palacios:

I love that you said that.

Rene Molina:

A lot of pastors just ministry talk, ministry, talk, ministry talk. And it’s like Jesus also taught us to be normal people and normal guys, normal women. And that’s another difference of cultures, like first generation is all ministry. Eat, sleep and breathe. “You call me at midnight. I will answer you. I will be there.”

Mingo Palacios:

Yes. Yes.

Rene Molina:

But second generation, it’s like, “We’ve read the Boundaries book.”

Mingo Palacios:

“We’ve read boundaries book!”

Rene Molina:

“We’ve read boundaries book. We are not going to answer after this time. We pass it two minutes. I’m not answering.”

Mingo Palacios:

Yep.

Rene Molina:

And so even there we have to like get on the same page.

Mingo Palacios:

Understand, understand, understand.

Rene Molina:

Yes. So many differences.

Mingo Palacios:

I want to ask you a question as we shut this conversation down. What’s one step in the transition between generations that you would tell somebody like, “Go here first.” You mentioned that the relationship part, but for some people it, maybe this hits somebody who’s working with family in ministry, but for people who aren’t working for, their pastor is not in their family, how do you earn or how do you begin a relationship with somebody who on paper is your boss, but you’re not like hanging out at their house, babysitting their kids?

Rene Molina:

Honestly, to me, just one word comes to mind is you need to listen to that first generation pastor. You need to listen to your, in the sense of like, you need to understand first. Take notes on them. Ask them questions instead of giving them answers, ask them questions.

Mingo Palacios:

Listen to understand.

Rene Molina:

Listening to understand. Listen until you understand. Ask until you understand. Don’t assume, ask. Leadership begins with listening.

Mingo Palacios:

Hey.

Rene Molina:

What do you envision for the next generation? What are some of the foundations that you need that you would love to see in the next generation? What are some of the dangers that you fear of the next generation? What are certain things that you don’t like about the next generation?

Mingo Palacios:

Of course.

Rene Molina:

So just asking questions and getting more on the instead of getting on the master mode and becoming a teacher and just, hey, just take notes about them. Listen, ask. And so in that same book, Multipliers, it’s so good, she says that “The great leaders are Socratic leaders” meaning in other words, the great leaders are questioning leaders. They ask questions more than give answers.

Mingo Palacios:

And they’re comfortable.

Rene Molina:

Yeah, yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

In a season where you can ask questions, not just feeling like you have to constantly deliver great answers.

Rene Molina:

Right. It’s just asking questions. And so to answer your question, it’s that. It’s go to your senior pastor and start asking them questions. Take them out to Starbucks or your favorite coffee shop. Just take them out. “Pastor, I want to ask you x, y, and z. Why is it this? Why is it there? Where do you see this? Where do you see the church here? How do you in the future, how do you see the world in the next generation? How do you see culture?” So I think if I could answer the question will be listening.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s such a good answer to that question. If people want to follow you and your ministry journey, where can they do that?

Rene Molina:

Well my Instagram, it’s Rene, R-e-n-e- j Molina, m-o-l-i-n-a and our little baby church that we just started, it’s RLAchurch.com.

Mingo Palacios:

Like our, like, o-u-r?

Rene Molina:

No, like the letters, RLA. It stands for restoration.

Mingo Palacios:

Ah. R-L-A.

Rene Molina:

Right.

Mingo Palacios:

Okay. Cool. RLAchurch.com. And pray for us and even please Mingo, pray for us as we navigate these interesting waters-

Mingo Palacios:

Of course.

Rene Molina:

Of onions differences and we’re just so excited. We love LA so much and Saddleback has been such an amazing mentor to us. I see saddleback as a whole just an amazing mentor to us on that transition, on our start. And so, yeah, if I could just, I know we’re finishing, but just a few further resources.

Mingo Palacios:

Absolutely.

Rene Molina:

So it’s been like vitamin supplements for us constantly taking them. And I know we’re in California, so we obviously analogies of health medicine and vitamins.

Rene Molina:

They put vitamins in that burrito dude. Don’t be afraid bro.

Rene Molina:

That vegan burrito.

Mingo Palacios:

[laughing]

Mingo Palacios:

Rene, we really appreciate you. We love the fact that you’re coming to the table asking questions, learning and on behalf of a generation showing us what it looks like to lead well. My prayer is that you’ll have more influence. You’ll have more people asking you questions because that posture is what’s going to unite generations and that’s what we need. We need a united generation. Like you said, it’s not a church divided is not the church for the first generation. Then the next church for the next generation.

Rene Molina:

Not about the Moses or the Joshua.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s the body altogether operating in a healthy synchronized motion. Yeah. So, bro, I appreciate you being here.

Rene Molina:

Thanks for the invite man.

Mingo Palacios:

Absolutely. For our podcast listeners, we love you guys. We’ll talk to you guys soon. We hope today’s insights left you feeling inspired and propelled towards your greatest potential. Thanks again for joining us for another episode of the PD Podcast. Until next time.

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