development,
leadership,
32m 54s

Episode 14: Ministry Disruptors, Bleeding Out & Intentional Growth Strategies

January 31, 2017

Episode 14: Ministry Disruptors, Bleeding Out & Intentional Growth Strategies

Mingo and Dr. Stephen K. (Stephen K. Leadership) talk intergenerational leadership hurdles – What to do with organizational disruptors, building time to fail, the benefits of facilitating after action reviews, plus other great tools for leaders to consider when taking an org or business to the next level. #PDCtour #PDChurch

Music: Dominic Bali

EPISODE RESOURCES

GO DEEP INTO THE DIMES DROPPED, CONNECT WITH THE SPEAKER, AND CHECK OUT THE LINKS & RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:

  1. www.stephenkgroup.com
  2. Facebook: @StephenKLeadership
  3. Twitter: @StephenKLeadership

OTHER RESOURCES

  1. Book – Ceilingless

Episode Quotable

Grab your reading glasses and download the PDF here.

Episode 14 Transcript

Mingo Palacios:

Welcome to the Touring for Purpose podcast. This is Mingo, your host, and I am back in the RV. We’ve had an incredible week of traveling. We were in San Diego earlier this week, connecting with Terry Wayne Brooks. Yesterday we were up in Malibu; we were at Pepperdine University. We were actually listening to just a really revealing amount of data that the Barna Group had put out all about the state of the pastor as we know it and the status of the local church.

Today, back in sunny southern California, and we’ve got the great pleasure of welcoming a guest, Dr. Stephen K. What’s your last name, Stephen K.?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Kalaluhi.

Mingo Palacios:

Come on, dude, how come I haven’t been calling you Kalaluhi all day? That’s legit, man.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

It rolls off the tongue.

Mingo Palacios:

Kalaluhi. Stephen is a part of his own personal leadership brand called Stephen K. Leadership, but he’s also invested across a few different businesses and endeavors, right?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Absolutely.

Mingo Palacios:

Connected by way of proxy with a very young influential leader that we both know well.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

An emerging leader.

Mingo Palacios:

An emerging leader, Nick Moultrie and Stevi Moultrie. Shout out to them.

Stephen, you’ve been super generous – we met for lunch and then boom, you gift me with three books that you’ve authored. It’s a goal of my own personal endeavors that I want to write one of these days. You are well-studied not just in book and in theory, but in practical experience.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Practical application.

Mingo Palacios:

All things leadership.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Yes sir.

Mingo Palacios:

You’re in the right spot. This is the right conversation to be had, especially with a group of people who are so eager to become the best versions of themselves.

So tell me, Stephen, your whole world is wrapped around helping people become better leaders; in a nutshell, what is your thing? People go, what’s Stephen K. Leadership? Give me the elevator pitch that’ll send us down this conversation.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Absolutely. This is one of those things where we’ve already talked about it during lunch. I’m just going to reiterate.

My personal belief is that anybody can be a great leader. Just like you have athletes that have great potential, you have musicians that have great potential – they will rise to the top much more quickly than somebody who doesn’t have that potential. But at the end of the day, anybody can be an athlete, anybody can be a musician, as long as they’re willing to put in the effort, the energy, the time and the resources to become great.

I view leadership as a skillset, and as a skillset, that means that you can learn it if you’re willing to invest the time to learn it.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s so good. I’m thinking right now that there are probably several people – your ears and your hearts should be on fire, because you have just been given permission to become better. It’s not the hand that you were dealt, but it’s getting through the card game and actually making the best of what you’ve got.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Without a doubt.

Mingo Palacios:

I love that. We’re going to recycle a bunch of stuff – we had just met, actually, during lunch, which was so awesome. I love it. You’ve got a tenacity, you’ve got a hustle in you. You wanted to attend UCLA, didn’t have the funding –

Stephen Kalaluhi:

USC.

Mingo Palacios:

Oh, USC, I apologize. Wrong colors.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

[laughs] Wrong side of the track.

Mingo Palacios:

But it was determined in you – I love that you said about yourself that you have this personality that when you look at any particular pathway, you want to know what the ultimate end road is, right?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Absolutely.

Mingo Palacios:

You didn’t just lay to the wayside when presented a challenge. You went and hustled your way to figure out how to make it happen. That’s a lesson that a lot of us need to know: the ability to fail forward or rise above the circumstance.

Give us a little bit of background on some of the things that you’ve helped pioneer. You said you had started a few different businesses, and you’re in this stream now. You’re experiencing some great dividends on the backend of that. What do you want to tell some young leaders as they themselves are probably thinking, “I want to get started. I’m afraid of failing. What do I do?”

Stephen Kalaluhi:

You can’t be afraid of failure, first of all. If you’re going to do anything great in this world, if you’re going to do anything great from a business perspective, from an entrepreneurial perspective, from a leadership perspective, you cannot be afraid to fail. The more you fail, the better you become. The more you fail, the more you learn. The more you fail, the stronger and more resilient you become. It’s one of those things where I don’t want to talk to you unless you’ve failed in life, because then we can meet on common ground.

Mingo Palacios:

We have something in common.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Exactly. It’s one of those things where if you don’t fail, you really can’t experience what true success is.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s almost like you don’t know what it tastes like unless you’ve tasted the bitterness of failure. Which makes success so much sweeter.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Exactly. That mountaintop is much more enjoyable when you’ve spent a few years in that valley and you’ve not seen the sun.

Mingo Palacios:

Totally. Your feet feel good when you get to the top of whatever it is that you’re hiking up. You instantly create permission to not have it all together and not win every single time you make an effort to do something.

As somebody who has been in charge of several people through a specific department – you had said at one point at a company, you were in charge of…

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Eighty-seven people.

Mingo Palacios:

You don’t look old enough to be in charge of 87 people, bro.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Thank you.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s that Hawaiian-Filipino combo, dude, I’m telling you. [laughs]

Stephen Kalaluhi:

It’s the blood. It’s great blood. [laughs]

Mingo Palacios:

You said you were #12 of that company, you were the 12th hire, but then here comes nearly 90 people behind you. How did you manage the tension of the expectation that was above you? Because you just so confidently said you can’t be afraid to fail, and yet I can’t imagine you being in a position where you instantly, naturally felt that.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

No. The desire to fail, I don’t think it’s something that you’re innately born with.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s like the fear of falling off a bike.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

It’s not something that you’re going to wake up one day and say “I’m going to fail today.” It’s not something you purposely look for. It’s just how you deal with that.

Mingo Palacios:

How you process through failure.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Exactly. When you’re in an organization where you’ve got 90 people or so you’re responsible for, you really have to look at what’s best for everyone. The challenge with that is in corporate organizations, you always have a structure that you have to butt your head up against in order to break through certain ceilings. You have process that you have to fight through, you have structure that you have to fight through, and there’s people that are always going to be saying “that’s not the way it’s supposed to be done.”

Unfortunately, those are the types of things that great leaders will have to fight against consistently and constantly until the structure and the culture of the organization supports the innovation and the disruptiveness of what needs to happen in today’s society.

Mingo Palacios:

For lack of a better term, there’s a certain sex appeal in being a disruptor. But in an organization, disruptors are not the popular people.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

No. Disruptors are sexy when the culture supports it. When the culture supports you getting out there and being innovative and you being disruptive, then those are the rock stars of the organization. If you come into an organization where everybody is set in stone, “this is the way it’s always been done,” disruptors are the first ones to get let go. They are looked at as the black sheep of the organization and they’re put into the corner until it’s time to give them their pink slips.

Mingo Palacios:

People are identifying the whole millennial generation as a disruptive generation. As we look at organizational leadership, the unavoidable fact that you’re going to have to be bringing in a whole new generation of people to the workforce – or ministry – what do we do with the fact that there’s almost a natural inclination to want to find the ceiling and break through it and push it?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Find the ceiling, bust through it. Find the walls, bust through those. From a disruptive perspective, again, it’s that culture. We’re teaching leaders now the power of collaboration and the idea that just because you’re the CEO, just because you’re the president, doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re always going to have the best ideas. Leaders recognize that great ideas can come from anyone, anywhere, at any time.

Mingo Palacios:

Whoa, just slow down on that one. I want that one to go through again.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Great ideas come from anyone, anywhere, at any time. It doesn’t matter if you’re the janitor who’s emptying trash cans, if you’re the person who’s cleaning toilets, or if you’re the guy who’s been onsite for two days. Great leaders recognize that great ideas aren’t confined to a CEO title or a corner office.

Mingo Palacios:

Position, yeah. That’s so big. With that context, we have two people that we really are going to have to coach real well. This is a generic person. During lunch we were talking about the three standout generations that are having to wrestle through leadership.

The Boomers would be articulated at 60ish and above. Gen Xers begin at the 50-something range and they go down to roughly their 40s. Then you’ve got the millennial generation. I’m a part of that millennial cusp. I barely make it; I was born in ’82. Some literature would say that it began at the ’80s and somehow right now we’re experiencing another variation of it.

That gives us the organizational reality that there are three types of leaders generationally. One is extremely collaborative, one is extremely skeptical, and the other one is extremely frustrated. In that space, as players within an organization, how can we create those collaborative environments? If I’m not the top guy, if I’m just a guy in the organization, what do I do as a learning leader to create the best possible scenario? If I’ve got a hunch or if I see my organization slanting a little bit, what do you give me as advice?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

I think it’s all a matter of identifying the fact that those multiple generations of leaders exist and not shooing away a millennial because they are considered disruptive, not ignoring a Baby Boomer because their ideas are old and stale. It’s coming to the point where everybody is celebrating their differences and building upon those differences from that perspective.

We talked about it earlier. Everybody needs a Baby Boomer to speak into their lives because they’ve seen it, they’ve done it, and they’ve lived through certain things. Everybody needs a millennial to speak into their lives to keep them on point. You talked about the bleeding edge and the cutting edge and having that disruptive mindset. We as leaders today can’t be stuck in any one way, shape, or form.

Mingo Palacios:

Singular framework.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Exactly. You get stuck in a singular framework and then the only time that framework works is when that particular situation or circumstance comes along.

Mingo Palacios:

And tell me, when have you ever found yourself as a leader only trying to problem-solve within a single paradigm against a single generation?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Exactly. I don’t want to talk about the programs that I bring, but it identifies –

Mingo Palacios:

I like this. Let’s get in there. You’re not just some great observer; you’re a certified leadership – you can help organizations navigate the pains of becoming better.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

You talked about coaching. When my team and I come into an organization, we address every leader at every level at every role, and it’s because you have the Baby Boomer CEOs/vice presidents, the ones who have built the company up. They have a mindset –

Mingo Palacios:

They labored early.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Exactly. Then you have the next-gens who are trying to figure things out. They’re stuck between the Baby Boomers and the millennials. The millennials, like you said, are frustrated with the lack of action, the lack of disruption that they’re seeing.

Mingo Palacios:

The lack of significance also. The outworkings of whatever it is they’re putting their hands to.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

It’s the social aspect. When you come in as a coach, you have to look at where they’re coming from and help them see from different sets of eyes. That includes everyone – not just the CEOs, not just the middle managers, not just the millennials who are just cutting their teeth. It’s everybody in between. Everybody has to have the benefit of seeing from everybody else’s eyes, because there’s value in that. But if you are ignoring the value that they bring, then you’re missing out on things. In order for organizations to flourish and succeed today, they have to be willing to open up their eyes to other perspectives.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s really good. I have my hands in several different companies, some that I’ve started, some that I’ve been welcomed to be a part of. We call it a leadership gap in the conversation, the people that I play these roles with, where there’s a collective opinion somewhere down the ranks of the organization. There’s a big hallway, an executive office door, and then there’s the executive team that lives in almost a siloed ecosystem. There’s never an opportunity to be the bridge between those.

If we want to make a difference and unify those spaces, does it require a martyr to go and die on behalf of all the people that will eventually have a voice behind you? How do you close that gap?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

You have to challenge leaders to be courageous. It all comes down to being a courageous leader. Like you said, if you’re not doing it properly you will end up being a martyr. You will get slaughtered in that hallway trying to bridge that gap.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s why it’s the bleeding edge, because you bleed out when you get brave. [laughs]

Stephen Kalaluhi:

But the idea is for you to bleed out for a purpose.

Mingo Palacios:

Come on! In the Purpose Driven bus.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

You like how I dropped that? [laughs]

Mingo Palacios:

In the Purpose Driven bus he says we bleed out for a purpose. I love that.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

The purpose has to be growth. You walk into any organization, it doesn’t matter what industry you’re in, no matter what ministry you’re in, the purpose of that business, the purpose of that ministry is growth. Growing the person individually, growing the organization as a whole.

In order to achieve that growth, you have to bridge that gap. When you have a singular purpose, when everyone is marching to the same beat, everyone hears the same tune, everyone has the same vision, you’re able to get to that bleeding edge, get to the point where you’re making it safely to the other side.

And then you’re mending the hurts that prevent you from seeing from other people’s perspectives. I guarantee you, the large majority of Baby Boomers look at millennials in such a way because of the disruptiveness that they bring to the industry, and they’ve experienced hurts because of that.

Mingo Palacios:

Therefore they have a lack of trust.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

They have a lack of trust, without a doubt. It goes for all the different generations as well. Their hurt is because they’ve experienced something they didn’t expect to experience, and it causes them to generalize that hurt to everybody else from outside of their perspective.

But when you have a singular purpose – the millennials, the Baby Boomers, the next-gens – when they all have the same purpose, they can bridge that gap and say “In order for us to grow, I can bring this perspective.” “In order for us to grow, I’m going to bring this perspective.” That is when you can collaborate in a way that most organizations will never experience.

Mingo Palacios:

What do you do with failure as the manager? I’ve had the luxury of employing a few guys in my time as an entrepreneur myself, and there’s a very tight-wound tension. We have a product that needs to be presented with professionalism, so as much as I want to give the guys room to fail, I can’t compromise our product. As a manager, how do we create safe places for failure?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

It’s one of the toughest things you will ever face as a leader. Making the space for your people to fail, making the space for yourself to fail. There are going to be initiatives that you roll out, products that you roll out that have to be done a certain way. It doesn’t necessarily mean it has to be done the way you want it. The final product has to be how you want it.

You have to create baby steps, almost, where you can give a small project to a team, let them take it, let them interpret what it’s supposed to look like, let them fail along the way – but give yourself enough time to come in and tweak it if it needs to be tweaked.

Mingo Palacios:

So you have to do the due diligence of creating that kind of margin.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Oh, without a doubt. You have to view failure as an opportunity for your team to grow.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s a tool.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

It is. It’s a teaching moment. You have kids; as you’re raising your kids, you’re always looking at their mistakes and their failures and their bumps and their bruises as teachable moments. It’s the same exact thing for your team. If you don’t build that time in, they will never be able to grow.

If you don’t have time built in, what ends up happening is you take it from them, you fix it the way you want it to be fixed, and then you send out the product and they never have the benefit of learning what’s going on inside your head – the process you follow, the process you saw. They need that time. As a leader, you build that in.

Mingo Palacios:

I’m thinking organizationally. That means, if you’re listening to this podcast, if you’re listening to this conversation, you can’t only have the reprimand moment. You have to cultivate a moment where there’s reflection, where there’s awareness, where there’s the perceived “I gave you this so that we could XYZ.” Unpack that.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

I was in the military from 1993 to 1999.

Mingo Palacios:

Thank you for your service.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Thank you. One of the best things that the Army has ever done is have after-action reviews after every exercise. It was a moment in time where all of the leaders got together and they reflected on the exercise. What did they do well? What could they have done better? So every single exercise you go through, whether it’s training, whether it’s preparing, you’re always asking the question: what did we do well? What could we have done better? You’re always getting better. Every single training exercise, every single mission, you’re getting better.

That’s how leaders have to come to situations like that. Bring your team to the side. “We just finished this huge project. What did we do well?” Get that feedback. “What could we have done better?” Get their feedback again.

It’s their growth that’s going to be most important to them. You can tell them all day long, “You should’ve done this, you should’ve done that” – in one ear, out the other. But give them an opportunity to say “we probably could’ve tweaked this” or “if we had spent more time planning, we could’ve saved time here” – let them come up with that action plan, because when they own it, it becomes a part of who they are as opposed to you just shoving it down their throats.

Mingo Palacios:

What I’m hearing out of you is that as a collective of both players and leaders, we have to get real comfortable with the concept of review. That’s a fearful place to be. I hate – you think “oh man, my mid-year review is coming up, or my end-of-project, we’re going to review this thing” – instantly that creates this [feeling] like I’m going to yak, I’m going to throw up because I’m so nervous about reviewing my progress or what I’ve put into this project. But we need to eliminate that schism. We need to eliminate that fear.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

The negative connotations associated with reviews is very damning to organizations and leaders. Again, it all comes back to growth. We’re going to have this after-action review so that we can grow. We’re going to reflect on what we just did so that we can grow. Everything comes back to growth. I’m going to pull you aside to coach you so that you can grow. I’m going to reprimand you on your behavior so that you can grow. I’m going to give you this book to read so that you can grow. We’re going to take time to reflect so that you can grow. It’s all about growth.

Mingo Palacios:

I would feel way better knowing no matter what the action was, that the outcome, by way of my leader, was always intended to be growth.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Yes. Now, think about the impact that a leader could have on a team of individuals if that leader was always coming at everything they were doing with the mindset of “How do I help my team grow? How do I help this person on my team grow?”

That’s where leaders get into trouble nowadays. They have this blanket leadership statement over their entire team, where they’re trying to lead every single person on their team in one way. The reason that doesn’t work is the same reason that I can’t father my two boys in the exact same way. My 15-year-old couldn’t be more different than my 10-year-old and my 10-year-old couldn’t be more different than my 15-year-old. I have to father them very differently in order to achieve the results that I want for their lives.

It’s the same thing with my teams. I have to lead them individually; I have to grow them individually. I can’t have this blanket statement.

Mingo Palacios:

Blanket approach.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Yeah. I can’t lead you blanket-style in hopes that everyone is going to grow at the same time.

Mingo Palacios:

What I keep thinking of is in so many cases where I think teams are operating, they make the thing results, not growth. If the result was growth, then I would play under a different pretense on that team. But when it’s just gaining results for the sake of results, the scoreboard, instantly I have a competitive fear against the guy that I’m working alongside of because all of a sudden it’s like, are my results better than your results?

But if collectively, it was about mutual growth, if I only scored 5 points and you scored 8 points, I know we’re both going to grow out of the scenario.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Absolutely.

Mingo Palacios:

Leaders need to focus on that growth language, becoming better at language.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

It’s a growth mindset as well. The uncomfortable conversations become more comfortable when you focus on growth. If I have to sit you down to talk about a behavior that I disagree with, it’s not me personally attacking you. It’s not me disagreeing with the behavior. It’s about me allowing you to grow by bringing that behavior to light. This behavior is preventing your growth. I don’t care about what you think about me. All I’m focused on is helping you become the leader that you need to become.

Mingo Palacios:

We’ve talked on the level of leader; let’s talk on the level of the pioneer. Let’s get into that pioneer conversation. You had mentioned during lunch that you had started several efforts for businesses – you said three went to the grave.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Failed, miserably.

Mingo Palacios:

Before you really saw your fourth one run. But even before running your own businesses, you were a part of several businesses. We’re in a culture where we’re capable of creating now more than ever. Anybody can become, or at least try to start something. We have all the tools right at our fingertips to be able to do that.

What do you tell somebody who’s experienced a recent failure? I know you can’t be afraid of failure, but falling forward and really having that determination bone in you – you’re experiencing the fruits of now your fourth effort. You’re not, though, exclusively running this ministry or this business without the skills that you learned from the previous three.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Oh, absolutely. Your ‘why’ has to be bigger than everything else that’s going on around you. Your ‘why’, your purpose, has to be bigger than the failure that you’re experiencing. When your purpose and your ‘why’ is bigger than everything else around you, it all becomes about growth. I didn’t fail three times; I learned how not to do something three times. That whole Thomas Edison thing. He didn’t fail 10,000 times. He learned how not to make a lightbulb 10,000 different ways.

That’s how failing is. It should be considered a rite of passage. I need to fail in order to become stronger. I need to fail in order to become more resilient. I need to fail in order to learn how not to do this, so that when it rears its ugly head again, I can identify it. I can recognize it.

Mingo Palacios:

Identify it early, course correct.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Absolutely.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s super good. You gave me three epic books: The Crux of Leadership, The Secret to Building High-Performance Teams, and Ceilingless. You authored all three of these books.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Yes sir.

Mingo Palacios:

Which one do you love the most?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Ceilingless, without a doubt.

Mingo Palacios:

Tell me why.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Ceilingless is a labor of love that I had on a thumb drive for about two years before I did anything with it. It was one of those books that I wrote for myself as I was failing, as I was learning how to fail. It was one of those things where God laid on my heart this desire to do something great. Like I mentioned at lunch, I knew I was created for greatness. I wasn’t going to settle for less than that best.

Ceilingless came more out of a journaling exercise than anything, identifying that dream that God placed on my heart, identifying that purpose that God placed on my heart and then following hard after that, not letting anything get in the way. That’s what Ceilingless is really all about: identifying that goal and then taking that first step, and then taking that second step, and then taking the 300th step. And knowing that as long as you are following hard after that dream, nothing will stop you.

Mingo Palacios:

You have recently started to build your team under Stephen K. Leadership, Nick being one of those guys.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Come on. Moultrie is a beast.

Mingo Palacios:

Come on, dude. Even though he got Thai food all over him at lunch. [laughs] Calling out my boys!

My question is for other young guys looking to learn well, study appropriately. What are you looking for in a teammate as you are now becoming the head of the org? You’re putting your chips on the table; you’re risking big in a certain sense when you’re bringing on an employee. That’s certainly a threshold that you’ve broken through.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

For sure.

Mingo Palacios:

What were you looking for, and what should other entrepreneurs be looking for as they build into their own brand or their own ministries to make a collective team?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

I am at the cusp of that next-gen/Baby Boomer generation. I know how Facebook Live works, but I don’t know how to do all the sharing and all the other good stuff. I recognize where my weaknesses are.

When you start to build out a team, you’ve got to identify what those weaknesses are so that you can fill those gaps. We talked about the gaps in leadership; it’s because people aren’t willing to say “I don’t know how to do this. I don’t know how to get here. I don’t know how to say this.”

When bringing Nick on, I know it was very God-driven, having Nick come on. The fact that his strengths shore up my weaknesses just made us a perfect match. His tech-savviness in building out my Instagram page and doing everything on Facebook has elevated the visibility of Stephen K. Leadership as a brand to levels that I would never have experienced on my own – but I would’ve never gotten to that point if I came into this saying “I know everything I need to know.”

So when you start to build out your team, start to identify those things that you don’t do well, and then as you interview, find people who can shore those up.

Mingo Palacios:

That should be an easy exercise to operate.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

You would think.

Mingo Palacios:

But it’s not. [laughs]

Stephen Kalaluhi:

It is a challenge. Especially for the next-gen, and the Baby Boomers especially. Admitting that you don’t know something is very challenging.

Mingo Palacios:

How did you become self-aware in that sense? Did you write down “Stephen K. These are the things I’m good at, these are the things I suck at. I need to find this person”?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Reflection was a huge part. Reflection was huge. I knew the value of social media, I knew the value of videos, I knew the value of having that presence; I didn’t know how to get there. So I recognized the importance of having those things in place. The next thing was to find somebody who could bring that value to the organization.

Nick just fell in my lap through different relationships and all that good stuff. God has really allowed Nick to flourish in this part of the organization to the point where we were talking this morning about bringing him on into some of the different videos that we do to speak to that millennial age leader, that emerging leader.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s great. Unless I take the job first, bro. [laughs] Stephen, as we wrap up this conversation, I can only imagine people wanting to hear more from your unique perspective. I love it. You’ve got a young mindset. You said you’re 42, right?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Forty-two.

Mingo Palacios:

For all the people that are naysaying, like “this guy has got all this stuff to say, where’s his track record?” – you’ve got several decades in the workforce and now as a skilled and observant leader, able to help other organizations navigate those potential pitfalls and hurdles that were keeping them from becoming the best version I think that they imagine themselves to be. When this podcast is over, I’m going to have you assess me as an independent leader.

How do people follow up with you? Where can I get your stuff?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

All the books that I’ve written – these are the three that I’m most proud of and that I bring with me when we go to speaking engagements, but all the books can be found on Amazon. You can just google my name and six or seven different titles will show up. All of them are available on Amazon.

Mingo Palacios:

And your favorite is Ceilingless.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

My favorite is absolutely Ceilingless. If that was the only book that I could ever push moving forward, it would be that one. The other two are great from an organizational standpoint, but this speaks to the heart of who you are as a leader, the heart of who you are as an individual, and it allows you to feel like Rocky when you get to the top of those steps in Philadelphia and “The Eye of the Tiger” is playing. That’s what this book allows you to feel like.

Mingo Palacios:

Give me your social handles. If people want to start following you now, how do they do that?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Oh gosh.

Mingo Palacios:

Or maybe we tee up the young man to our right. [laughs] What are the social media channels?

Nick Moultrie:

You want me to jump in?

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Please, please.

Mingo Palacios:

Welcome, everybody, Nick Moultrie back to the… [laughs]

Nick Moultrie:

All right. I’m just trying to clean off all this Thai food I spilled all over earlier.

Stephen Kalaluhi:

Saving it for later.

Nick Moultrie:

I’m saving some for later.

Mingo Palacios:

I love it. Nick, where can we find Stephen K.’s material online?

Nick Moultrie:

I’m excited because just recently on Instagram, we started doing a lot more videos. 60 Seconds with Stephen K. Leadership. We’re going to be throwing out videos every single day. Just go to Instagram and follow @stephenkleadership. And then Facebook. Those two right now are what we’re really pioneering and charging.

Mingo Palacios:

I’m assuming that there’s probably going to be a bunch of conversation that’s going to bounce because of this. A lot of people are probably thinking to themselves, “man, I’ve got to get better at this” or “man, I need to really soak this in” or “man, I wish my boss heard this.”

I want you to be brave enough – remember Stephen was talking about leaders have to be courageous? I want you to be courageous. I want you to tag some people in this and I want you to start a conversation amongst the people that you’re doing life with, that you’re leading with.

Because you won’t get better if you’re learning in an isolated environment. It actually becomes poisonous when you start to hear something and then the people you expect to be reacting because of what you heard aren’t making moves because they haven’t heard it yet. So don’t be dumb. Don’t be a dumb leader. Share this so that people can start to engage with the conversation that we’ve had.

Stephen, I really appreciate your insights. I’m hoping that this won’t be the only time we get to see each other in the bus. It would be awesome to bring a bunch of people together and have a forum on leadership. I think that we’re missing that.

If you want to, again, share or subscribe or comment on our podcast, it’s Touring for Purpose. You can find it on iTunes and, again, through social media. We’re #touringforpurpose. I’m @mingo2 on Instagram, and you can follow along with our exploits with the bus. You can follow #pdctour or #pdchurch and you’ll see all of our travels there.

I’m glad you guys joined us. For our Facebook Live community, thanks for being a part of this conversation. We will talk to you guys soon.

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